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Natural Joint & Back Pain Management

Get back to the things you love with Spark’s integrated non-surgical approach to joint and orthopedic injuries. We help you regain mobility, reduce pain, and avoid surgery and steroids.

When faced with the choice of surgery or a joint replacement, many patients seek treatment options from our team of specialists. Our natural and non-surgical approach helps you manage your acute pain and diminished mobility, while providing long-term, whole-body support for continued healing and injury prevention.

Knee

A torn meniscus is one of the most common knee injuries and can occur from acute trauma or as the result of degenerative changes that happen over time. Meniscus is a C-shaped piece of tough, rubbery cartilage that acts as a shock absorber between the tibia (shinbone) and femur (thighbone). Tears can occur when there is both compression and twisting, frequently with ligament injuries. A torn meniscus causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and the inability to extend your knee fully.

Typical symptoms include joint pain, swelling, redness, stiffness, instability, immobility, or crepitus (crackling, popping, or squeaking sounds emanating from the joint). Because osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease related to “wear and tear” of the cartilage in the affected joint, symptoms gradually worsen over time. Age is the biggest risk factor for OA, but joint trauma due to accidents or sports injuries are also significant risk factors. Gender is also a major risk factor as OA is more common in women than men. In the United States, symptomatic knee OA alone affects almost 10% of males and 13% of females over the age of 60.

These strong, fibrous, elastic bands of interwoven collagen fibers surround the joint, supporting and limiting its movement. An overstretched or torn ligament is a sprain. Ligament injuries occur in any high-intensity sport involving running and pivoting, commonly seen in the knees and ankles but possible in any joint (e.g., the wrist, thumb, shoulder, neck, and back).

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears or ruptures occur most commonly in young and active individuals and can have negative long-term physical impacts. The function of ligaments is to hold abutting bones at a joint in place. Damage to ligaments is diagnosed by using the patient’s history, clinical examination, and imaging studies. Treatment objectives are to restore knee function and prevent further injury and osteoarthritis (OA). Without the proper support at a joint, cartilage can wear down over time, as in OA, causing further damage. In the US alone, over 250,000 people per year suffer from ACL tears. Most ACL injuries are sports-related, although they can also occur during rough play, motor vehicle collisions, falls, and work activities. Less than 30% of ACL tears are the result of contact with another athlete; 60-70% of ACL tears occur without contact. Female athletes may be up to eight times more likely than males to experience an ACL tear2.

Hip

Typical symptoms usually develop slowly, worsen over time, and are more pronounced in the morning or when sitting for long periods of time. The most common area for pain is in the groin, but can also be felt in the thigh, buttocks or down your leg to the knee. Other symptoms include crepitus, the grinding noise and “locking” or “sticking” that you feel when you move your hip, stiffness in the hip joint makes it difficult to walk or bend, and a decreased range of motion that causes a limp.

A hip labral tear can be caused by injury, degenerative health conditions, and/or structural ailments. This tear in the labrum, a specialized cartilage inside the hip joint, may result in symptoms such as pain in the hip or stiffness, pain in the groin or buttocks, and a feeling of unsteadiness.

When the muscle or tendon around the hip joint is pulled and stretched beyond its limit, this can result in a hip strain or a tear. Hip tendon tears are typically sudden and acute, and the result of sports activity.

Shoulder

Caused by overuse or acute injury, a rotator cuff strain or tear can cause a progressive weakening of the shoulder, decreased range of motion, and pain. Aside from an acute injury causing the tear, long-term overuse is a major risk factor for athletes, especially for those involved in tennis, baseball, and rowing. It’s also more commonly seen in people over age 40.

The shoulder labrum is a thick piece of tissue attached to the rim of the shoulder socket that helps keep the ball of the joint in place. Common causes of a torn shoulder labrum include overuse of the shoulder or injury. A labrum tear can make a shoulder weaker and less stable, and cause deep shoulder pain.

Though typically associated with people over 50, shoulder osteoarthritis can also occur in younger people that have suffered a traumatic shoulder injury such as a fracture or dislocation. Shoulder osteoarthritis is caused by both genetic and behavioral factors, and, similar to other types of osteoarthritis, pain and limited range of motion are the key symptoms. Shoulder osteoarthritis can cause chronic dull pain or intermittent intense flare-ups of pain.

Shoulder bursitis is an injury or inflammation of the bursa around the shoulder joint. A bursa is a tiny, fluid-filled sac that functions as a gliding surface to reduce friction between tissues of the body. Symptoms of bursitis include discomfort when lying on your shoulder, pain on the outside or top of your shoulder, pain that gets worse when you lift your arm to the side, pain when pushing on or opening a door, pain when trying to “circle” your arm, and pressure and pain when pushing on the top of your shoulder.

Elbow

Overuse and repetitive contractions of the muscles and tendons of the forearm and elbow can put too much strain on the elbow tendons causing tendon injury that can lead to pain. Tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow are two of the most common elbow-related injuries. Pain around the lateral and medial elbow differentiate tennis elbow from golfer’s elbow. However, in both cases, the following symptoms may occur: pain and tenderness that may radiate into the forearm and wrist that worsen with certain movements that include twisting, gripping, extension, or making a fist, weakness in the hands and wrists, stiffness in the elbow, numbness or tingling that might radiate into one or more fingers. These conditions can become chronic, requiring medical intervention.

Overuse and repetitive contractions of the muscles and tendons of the forearm and elbow can put too much strain on the elbow tendons causing tendon injury that can lead to pain. Tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow are two of the most common elbow-related injuries. Pain around the lateral and medial elbow differentiate tennis elbow from golfer’s elbow. However, in both cases the following symptoms may occur: pain and tenderness that may radiate into the forearm and wrist that worsen with certain movements that include twisting, gripping, extension, or making a fist, weakness in the hands and wrists, stiffness in the elbow, numbness or tingling that might radiate into one or more fingers. These conditions can become chronic, requiring medical intervention.

Spine

These strong, fibrous, elastic bands of interwoven collagen fibers surround the joint, supporting and limiting its movement. An overstretched or torn ligament is a sprain. Ligament injuries occur in any high-intensity sport involving running and pivoting, commonly seen in the knees and ankles but possible in any joint (e.g., the wrist, thumb, shoulder, neck, and back).

One of the most common causes of low back and neck pain is degenerative disc disease. Overall, this condition refers to symptoms of back or neck pain due to age-related wear on a spinal disc. Symptoms can include chronic low-level pain, bouts of more severe pain, weakness, numbness, and strong radiating pains in the arms or legs.

Neck pain is a common complaint that is typically the result of poor posture or osteoarthritis. Symptoms include pain that increases when holding your head in one place for long periods, such as when driving or working at a computer, muscle tightness, spasms, decreased range of motion, and headaches. Common causes for neck pain include injury, nerve compression, muscle strains, wear and tear of joints, and disease.

Lumbar spine osteoarthritis is the most common area for arthritis-related back pain with 30% of males and 28% of females aged 55–64 suffering from this affliction. The most common symptom is pain and stiffness in the lower back that gets worse after standing or sitting upright for long periods of time.

Foot & Ankle

One of the most common sport injuries is a ligament tear or rupture in the ankle joint. Typically occurring when you twist or roll your ankle, a torn ligament is usually painful, causing swelling, bruising, and the inability to walk without pain. Symptoms include sudden pain, a tearing, snapping or popping sensation, the inability to put weight on your foot, and swelling around your ankle joint.

The Achilles tendon, which facilitates walking by helping raise the heel off the ground, runs down the back of the lower leg and connects the calf muscle to the heel bone. When stretched beyond capacity, this tendon will rupture causing either a complete or partial tear. The injury typically occurs while participating in sports, but can also occur from falling or tripping. Symptoms of a tendon tear include sudden pain in the back of the ankle or calf, a popping or snapping sensation, swelling on the back of the leg between the heel and the calf, and difficulty walking up stairs.

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative, typically age-related condition characterized by the breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage in joints. It can cause pain and stiffness in any joint, but it is most commonly seen in the small joints of the foot and ankle. Pain may develop gradually over time and symptoms include pain with motion, pain flare-ups with vigorous activity, tenderness when pressure is applied to the joint, joint swelling with additional warmth and redness, increased pain and swelling in the morning or after sitting or resting, and difficulty walking.

Plantar fasciitis affects as many as 10% of the population and is seen in people with both flat feet and high arches. It can occur at any age and in both athletes and non-athletes.This painful condition causes irritation in the foot when the plantar fascia (a band of tissue that supports the arch of your foot) becomes inflamed or tears. Pain can be felt in the heel, along the arch, or at the ball of the foot. The condition typically develops in athletes who run or jump, and with people whose jobs require them to be on their feet for most of the day.

Hand & Wrist

This syndrome is a common condition caused by pressure on the median nerve. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway surrounded by bones and ligaments on the palm side of your hand. In most patients, carpal tunnel syndrome gets worse over time, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. Symptoms include numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand and arm.

Since arthritis in the fingers and wrist is usually caused by degeneration that develops over time, it affects 60% of adults over age 60 and 80%-90% of those over age 75. Signs of wrist, hand, and finger arthritis include pain, swelling, joints that are warm to the touch, stiffness, numbness, tingling, bone spurs around finger joints, loss of mobility, and weakness. Causes include overuse of the joints, past traumatic injury to the fingers or wrists, wear and tear due to aging, and autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis.

Results that show relief

Patient Outcomes

Patients experienced an average of 95.6% symptom improvement for:

  • Joint Pain & Discomfort
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Fatigue & Brain Fog
  • Digestive Issues including SIBO
  • Hormone Imbalances
  • Thyroid Conditions

What we treat

  • Knee
  • Hip
  • Shoulder
  • Elbow
  • The spine
  • Foot & ankle
  • Hand & wrist

Charting a course for modern multidisciplinary care

Natural Joint & Back Pain Management

While our doctors are experts at providing restorative medical treatments to regain mobility and reduce pain, we also monitor overall body health to prevent future joint problems. By adding physical therapy, chiropractic, nutrient balancing and nutritional counseling to your care plan, you increase the likelihood of enhanced health outcomes.

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